Innovative thinking on how to prevent malaria

#BOHEMIAproject

Malaria elimination will not be possible in many settings with the current available tools. Vector control, our most effective strategy, is now challenged by widespread insecticide resistance and mosquitoes that avoid insecticides in bednets and sprayed indoors by biting outdoors, feeding upon animals or changing their biting times.

The BOHEMIA project, funded by Unitaid, will develop an innovative strategy to complement the existing tools: administer ivermectin (a mosquito-killing drug) to humans and livestock to reduce malaria transmission.

Bohemia
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Bohemia
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Let’s introduce
our work

Ivermectin is an anti-parasitic drug that kills mosquitoes feeding on treated subjects. Mass drug administration of ivermectin to humans and/or livestock tackles residual malaria transmission.

It targets mosquitoes that feed on treated humans regardless of the place and time of biting, as well as mosquitoes that feed partly on livestock and are not routinely exposed to insecticide within the home.

The time has come to
bite them back

Let’s introduce
our work

Ivermectin is an anti-parasitic drug that kills mosquitoes feeding on treated subjects. Mass drug administration of ivermectin to humans and/or livestock tackles residual malaria transmission.

It targets mosquitoes that feed on treated humans regardless of the place and time of biting, as well as mosquitoes that feed partly on livestock and are not routinely exposed to insecticide within the home.

The time has come to bite them back

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Receive updates -twice a year-
on the BOHEMIA project

Update me on the project

Whats’s new

Charfudin Sacoor - BOHEMIA Project

“Today humanity has more information and tools to fight malaria but the gains in this fight still create geographical asymmetries ”

In June 2004, Charfudin Sacoor started working at the Manhiça Health Research Centre (CISM), a BOHEMIA Project partner. Since 2010 he has led its Department of ...
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World Malaria Day

Post: Malaria in Times of COVID-19

[This text has been written by por Matiana González Silva and Regina Rabinovich, coordinator and director, respectively, of the Malaria Elimination Initiative].World Malaria Day 2021 - ...
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Caroline Jones, Oxford University

“Reducing inequity is the most effective way of protecting the vulnerable from malaria”

BOHEMIA’s lead social scientist Caroline Jones has 20 years of experience working in sub-Saharan Africa on the uptake and provision of health care with attention on ...
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